This website is intended for healthcare professionals.

FERACCRU® – HCP resources

On this page you’ll find many helpful resources to support your treatment decisions in iron deficiency anaemia (IDA).

You can access the latest IDA guidelines from ECCO and the BSG; watch expert videos about iron deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) including treatment with FERACCRU® and view animations summarising two important clinical trials of FERACCRU® in IBD.

Guidelines

ECCO, 2015

European Consensus on the Diagnosis and Management of Iron Deficiency and Anaemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

This consensus establishes up-to-date standards for the diagnosis, follow-up and management of anaemia in IBD patients with a special focus on IDA in IBD.

The guidelines recommend iron supplementation in all IBD patients, when IDA is present, with a goal of normalising haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations and iron stores.1

Intravenous iron should be considered first line for patients with clinically active IBD, with previous intolerance to oral iron, with haemoglobin below 10 g/dL, and in patients who need erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.1

Oral iron is recommended for patients with mild anaemia, whose disease is clinically inactive, and who have not been previously intolerant of oral iron.1

BSG 2021

British Society of Gastroenterology Guidelines for the Management of Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Adults.

These guidelines offer up-to-date advice for primary care and secondary care specialists in the management of IDA.

Initial iron replacement therapy (IRT) with one tablet per day of ferrous sulphate, fumarate or gluconate (50-100 mg elemental iron) is recommended.2 If not tolerated, a reduced dose of one tablet every other day, alternative oral preparations (including FERACCRU®) or parenteral iron should be considered.2

Parenteral iron should be considered when oral iron is contraindicated, ineffective or not tolerated.2

FERACCRU® is recommended as an option for patients with significant intolerance to oral IRT (usually GI disturbance).2

Expert video series

Real-world evidence treating iron deficiency anaemia in IBD patients

Dr Fraser Cummings discusses the real-world evidence for treating IBD patients with iron deficiency anaemia and where FERACCRU® sits in the iron treatment pathway. He also delivers an expert Q&A session on the treatment of iron deficiency.

Chapters

Why is iron deficiency anaemia important in IBD?

00:46-02:00

Causes of treatment failure with conventional oral iron therapy

02:00-03:37

What is FERACCRU®?

03:39-04:14

The AEGIS study: evidence for FERACCRU® for treating IDA in IBD (phase III clinical trial, 12-week data)

04:17-06:00

Long-term outcomes from AEGIS (open-label extension to 64 weeks)

06:01-06:36

Clinical trials: efficacy vs effectiveness

06:37-07:17

The FRESH study: real-world evidence for FERACCRU® for treating IDA in IBD patients

07:17-10:35

The place of FERACCRU® in the iron treatment pathway

10:36-12:14

Summary

12:15-12:47

Expert Q & A session – the treatment of iron deficiency

Q1. How frequently oral ferrous products fail in IBD patients and why do they fail?

13:16-14:33

Q2. In your experience, what is the average duration of treatment with FERACCRU® in IBD patients?

14:42-15:32

Q3. What are the reasons for starting patients on ferric maltol?

15:40-17:37

Q4. How can monitoring patient response to ferric maltol be improved?

18:01-19:18

Iron deficiency in CKD

Professor Roland Schaefer talks about iron deficiency anaemia in patients with CKD and the role of supplemental iron. He also outlines the results of the AEGIS-CKD study which investigated treating CKD patients with IDA with FERACCRU®.

Chapters

Prevalence of anaemia in CKD patients

00:38-02:06

Definition of iron deficiency in CKD patients (transferrin saturation (TSAT) and serum ferritin)

02:08-06:24

Treatment of iron deficiency in CKD patients

06:29-10:24

The role of traditional oral iron supplements in CKD

10:30-12:19

The role of IV iron supplements in CKD

12:20-16:14

FERACCRU® molecular structure

16:26-18:54

FERACCRU® mode of action

18:58-20:14

FERACCRU® in CKD: AEGIS-CKD study

20:15-31:11

FERACCRU® in IBD: AEGIS-IBD study

31:12-33:25

AEGIS-CKD study, adverse events

33:28-34:23

AEGIS-CKD study, conclusion

34:25-36:18

Clinical results treating iron deficiency anaemia in IBD with FERACCRU®

Dr Fraser Cummings explains why iron deficiency is important in an IBD population, the role of oral iron in the treatment of IBD and causes of failure. He then outlines the clinical evidence for FERACCRU® in IBD.

Chapters

Why is iron deficiency important in an IBD population?

00:29-01:55

Understanding how iron is absorbed

01:56-03:29

Oral iron in the treatment of IBD

03:30-04:33

Causes of oral iron failure

04:35-07:04

Iron absorption with ferric maltol, the active substance of FERACCRU®

07:06-08:38

Clinical evidence for FERACCRU® in AEGIS-IBD phase III clinical trial

08:39-13:39

Clinical trials vs real-world studies

13:40-16:13

Clinical evidence for FERACCRU® in the FRESH study (real world)

16:14-21:22

Where does FERACCRU® fit into the iron treatment pathway

21:23-23:26

Conclusion

23:27-24:28

FERACCRU® clinical trial animations

AEGIS IBD 12-week efficacy and tolerability

This short, animated video summarises key efficacy and tolerability data from a 12-week randomised placebo-controlled phase III clinical trial of FERACCRU® in IBD. Patients had mild to moderate IDA and were previously intolerant/unresponsive to oral iron.3

Chapters

Iron deficiency anaemia, a frequent complication of IBD

00:05-00:28

Oral ferrous iron preparations

00:29-00:44

Efficacy and tolerability of FERACCRU® in IBD

00:45-04:01

AEGIS IBD 64-week efficacy

This short, animated video summarises long-term efficacy and tolerability data from the 52-week open-label extension of the randomised placebo-controlled phase III clinical trial of FERACCRU® in IBD patients.4

Chapters

Iron deficiency anaemia in IBD and oral ferrous iron

00:04-00:32

Efficacy and tolerability of FERACCRU® in IBD

00:33-04:01

AE, adverse event; HRQoL, health-related quality of life; ID, iron deficiency; IDA, iron deficiency anaemia; IV, intravenous.

References:

  1. Dignass AU, et al. J Crohns Colitis 2015;211–222. doi:10.1093/ecco-jcc/jju009.
  2. Snook J, et al. Gut 2021;0:1–22. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2021-325210 1.
  3. Gasche C, et al. Inflamm Bowel Dis 2015;21(3):579–588.
  4. Schmidt C, et al. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2016;44(3):259–270.

 

GL-HAE-FER-2200026. Date of preparation: June 2022.

Hi, I'm Eric.
Click here to ask me a question about FERACCRU®